Forums

Forum Navigation
You need to register and login to create and read (some) posts

Amputating the self - A brief history of education

I talk about the "social class" nature of modern education in various places in the corpus. Here is an article that reinforces everything I've said. It is by a psychologist, Peter Gray, and it provides an excellent overview of modern, and also ancient traditional education, and why it is the way it is.


Additional content is available to LP members only. To get the full message, become a member, register and login.

-- All you need is love...

Repetition and memorization of lessons is tedious work for children, whose instincts urge them constantly to play freely and explore the world on their own. Just as children did not adapt readily to laboring in fields and factories, they did not adapt readily to schooling. This was no surprise to the adults involved. By this point in history, the idea that children's own willfulness had any value was pretty well forgotten. Everyone assumed that to make children learn in school the children's willfulness would have to be beaten out of them. Punishments of all sorts were understood as intrinsic to the educational process. In some schools children were permitted certain periods of play (recess), to allow them to let off steam; but play was not considered to be a vehicle of learning. In the classroom, play was the enemy of learning.

a quote from

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/freedom-learn/200808/brief-history-education

-- All you need is love...

Right off the bat, just reading the .pdf about how schools are structured made me feel queasy, bringing to my mind how I was poorly educated.

It is very unfortunate to grow up with the lack of critical thinking skills needed in life curriculum like ...sociology, philosophy or even comparative religion could have helped me in those earlier years. The only things I looked forward to then were Art, Music, Dance and lunch/recess in some way shape or form and depending on the grade I attended at those times.

Hearing the hopes of parents for their children to grow up as adults to work 25-30 years without a break just to get a goodbye trinket was all they looked forward to in the children, to 'make it big and take care of them' or one day give them grandkids being the highest thanks we could give them as being parents or other occupations that fit into their acceptable yet unrealistic paradigms. I also heard their contradictory messages of female children's ability to go out and play safely and in another breath, be derided as 'being too loose', while resigning myself to bury myself in the company of either a Judy Blume's book, "Are You There, God, it's Me, Margaret" or a bunch of other novels of escapist variety; I now see their underlying fears at a heavy and incalculable cost.

Attempting to daydream was difficult without being interrupted by a parent who 'needed' things when it could have been done without me.

Playing catch-up as an adult in assessing, mitigating and resolving creative insecurity and intellectual deficits are inescapably difficult and frustrating tasks; cultivating focus and structure are jobs unto themselves.

Recent forum posts

Nothingness
The Healing Power of Connection S …
CQ Saturation Point
A million hits a month
Mania Score
Repetitive Thoughts Score
Sleep Score
Somatic Score
How toxic is my world (self asses …

Pin It on Pinterest

Skip to toolbar